0

Donald Trump Really Doesn’t Want You To See These Photos

Whilst the heated dialogue around fake news and alternative facts continues to swirl and dominate news feeds around the world – British artist Alison Jackson (previously featured) is taking things to a whole other level. Her satirical series seemingly exposes the sordid and secretive life of Donald Trump.

More info: Alison Jackson (h/t: sobadsogood)

A behind-the-scenes look at a day in the life of one of the most powerful men in the world. Expertly edited and given that classic 90’s sheen, at first glance these images look like genuine Polaroid scans. Selfies with Miss World, candid shots with Klu Klux Klan and even a few intimate photos of the emperors new clothes round out the hilarious series.







0

Hilarious Memes Of Beluga Whale Who Upstaged A Bride By Photobombing Her On Her Big Day

As photobombs go, this is one for the scrapbook. A happy couple in the middle of their wedding vows were joined by a curious onlooker in the form of a beluga whale. During a wedding ceremony at Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut the bride-to-be was upstaged when the whale swam over to see what the commotion was about. Needless to the say, the internet didn’t waste any time having fun with the picture.

h/t: dailymail




0

This Tiny Prefab Home Inflates Itself With Body Heat

A brilliant application of material science toward simple living, this portable self-inflating structure folds up into a manageable miniature package but expands to create a small dwelling space.

More info: Martin Azua (h/t: weburbanist)

Created by Martin Azua, the Basic House is a genius “habitable volume; foldable, inflatable and reversible … made from metalized polyester” that uses body or solar heat to inflate itself. As its designer explains, “is not a product, rather a concept of extreme reduction.”

In a clever twist, this tiny portable space is made to be inverted so that it can deflect solar heat (for cold situations) in one configuration but capture it (to warm its interior) when reversed. Versatile and durable, the design could be used for everything from homeless shelters and travel tents to emergency housing and much more.



0

Surreal NSFW Dolls Reveal The Dark Fantasy Worlds That Live Under Their ‘Skin’

Fantasy doll maker Mari Shimizu hails from Amakusa, Kumamoto Japan where after graduating from Tama Art University, she dedicated herself to creating and photographing her intricate ball-joint dolls.

More info: Mari Shimizu, Hans Bellmer (h/t: dangerousminds)

Shimizu is deeply inspired by the Surrealist movement, especially Nazi-hating Dadaist, photographer Hans Bellmer whose scandalous work often incorporated dolls. Here are a few words from Bellmer on his artistic approach that appear to directly align to Shimizu’s ethos:

“The body resembles a sentence that seems to invite us to dismantle it into its component letters, so that its true meaning may be revealed ever anew through an endless stream of anagrams.”

Shimizu carves openings in her dead-eyed dolls in order to provide the viewer insight into the inner-workings of her inanimate creations. Themes that run through her work include mythology, religion, death and nature in which rabbits are common themes.

Rabbits are symbolic for a myriad of reasons and perhaps as it pertains to Shimizu’s work is how the rabbit is regarded as an “Earth” symbol—as it is the earthly aspect of its existence that allows the animal to retain its composure in the midst of chaos. Rabbits are also categorized as being “tricksters” in various mythological tales and folklore from around the world including Japan. Shimizu’s utilization of the dolls as unconventional artistic vehicles is about as tricky as it gets.









0

The White Frontier: Female Photographer Captures Beautiful Images Of Canada’s Most Remote Regions In The 1900s

Geraldine Moodie overcame harsh conditions to become western Canada’s first professional female photographer, capturing beautiful images in the country’s most remote regions. An exhibition, “North of Ordinary: The Arctic Photographs of Geraldine and Douglas Moodie”, is at Glenbow, Calgary, 18 February – 10 September.

Inuit women and children at summer camp, Fullerton Harbour, Nunavut, August 1906:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

Moodie was born in 1854 in Toronto, and after a move to England she met and married John Douglas Moodie in 1878, and had six children.

Inuit woman, Kootucktuck, in her beaded attigi. Fullerton Harbour, Nunavut, February 1905:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

The family returned to Canada to farm in Manitoba, before John began working with the North-West Mounted Police (aka the Mounties).

Hudson Bay Company store covered with furs, Churchill, Manitoba, circa 1906-09:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

Geraldine accompanied her husband on expeditions to the police’s detachment at the now-deserted Fullerton Harbour in Hudson Bay – an obscure, frozen point in Canada’s far north in what is now Nunavut territory.

Inuit man, Kingnuck, of the Kinepetoo tribe, Fullerton Harbour, Nunavut, February 5, 1905:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

She took portraits of the local Inuit people, while he documented the landscapes he found during his police patrols.

Inuit man, Toopealock, of the Kinepetoo, Fullerton Harbour, Nunavut, c.1904-05:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

“Words cannot describe this wonderful coast, apparantly (apparently) devoid of everything that goes to make a land attractive, it still has a grandeur and beauty all its own”, she wrote in her diary.

DGS Arctic frozen in the ice, Fullerton Harbour, Nunavut, April 1905:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

She wrote of the Inuit: “They are very bright and intelligent, her eyes were taking stock of everything all the time”.

Inuit woman, Mirkiook, and her child, Fullerton Harbour, Nunavut, c.1905:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

“The whole sea and land as far as the eye can see lends itself to inspire ghostly imaginations, nothing but snow & the sea in an unbroken expanse of ice and snow. In the sunshine it is beautiful, but at night it looks uncanny, the northern light shifting and changing all the time”

Inuit igloos, Fullerton Harbour, Nunavut, c.October 1903:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

“There is a shooting and trapping mania on board at present, a good thing as it keeps them in health and good spirits”, she writes, also mentioning plenty of dances and football matches.

Loading a polar bear carcass on to Neptune, Hudson Bay, Nunavut, July 20, 1904:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

She complains of the challenges of trying to take decent photographs amid waterlogged supplies and harsh weather.

Inuit woman ice fishing, Fullerton Harbour, Nunavut, 1905:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

Geraldine also writes of improving her technique, while photographing this boat, the Arctic.

“There has always been such a glare of snow with nothing to relieve that it gave no definition when photographed, and made a poor negative. I tried it under every condition of light, and finally found by stopping my lens very low and taking the photo when the afternoon sun was very bright, throwing strong shadows that I succeeded in getting a fine negative”

Dominion Government steamer Arctic in front of an iceberg, at the mouth of Hudson Strait, Nunavut, c.1904:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian

She went on to work further south in the city of Regina, Saskatchewan, and when accompanying John on expeditions for the Canadian Pacific Railway. With hundreds of emotive and lyrical images to her name, her legacy is of a true photographic artist, rather than a dispassionate documenter of rural life.

Inuit woman, Ooktook, with child, Fullerton Harbour, Nunavut, c.1904-05:

Geraldine Moodie/The Guardian